Jack and Jill – Brinnington

Brinnington Rd, Stockport SK5 8AD

Screen Shot 2016-01-20 at 10.34.14

High on a hill, above Stockport town centre sat the Jack and Jill.

Built in 1954 to serve the emerging nearby social housing estate.

A curved brick frontage overlooking the Goyt Valley.

Classical Moderne with a splash of Brut – it’s all over.

In happier times it served the Community.

 

 

I returned to find:

Tinned-up doors and windows, no sign of a sign.

No sign of signs of life, save the landlord of eight years packing up to leave for pastures new, The Friendship in Romiley.

“I want flat caps, darts and dominoes, its got a bowling green too!”

I asked if the Jack and Jill was to be demolished?

“It’s up for sale.”

No amount of vinegar and brown paper, I fear, will put Jack back together again.

Jill perpetually tumbling.

After.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Swinging Sporran – Manchester

78 Sackville St, Manchester M1 3NJ

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 11.08.47

South of the border down Manchester way, on the wrong side of the Tweed:

– sat The Swinging Sporran, closer to the culverted Medlock than thee.

What’s in a name?

The decontextualised allusion to outlandish Bamforth innuendo and Caledonian capers.

The Swinging Sporran now, no longer swings.

It began as an abrupt end to a multi-storey car park that wanted to go on forever.

A sociable adjunct to the Umist campus and a suitably Modernist companion in both style and demeanour, bunker like brick blocks just about topped by a residential core.

It became home to live music and DJs of every stripe, enough to induce spots before your very, very wavy eyes.

With thanks to http://www.mdmarchive.co.uk

The Swinging Sporran becomes The Retro Bar, having acquired a kiosk and coffee bar along the way, and an over elaboration of signage and detail that incautiously disguises its original spare aesthetic.

You can if you wish, escape through a door, climb the stairway to the stars, and gaze at the campus below, hurry though.

Nothing lasts forever.

DSC_0053 copy

DSC_0052 copy

DSC_0051 copy

DSC_0050 copy

DSC_0055 copy

DSC_0057 copy

DSC_0063 copy

DSC_0066 copy

DSC_0075 copy

DSC_0049 copy

DSC_0054 copy

DSC_0047 copy

DSC_0061 copy

DSC_0064 copy

DSC_0068 copy

DSC_0070 copy

DSC_0076 copy

DSC_0062 copy

The Valley – Collyhurst

Glendower Dr, Manchester, Greater Manchester M40 7TD

Screen Shot 2016-01-12 at 13.09.33

The Vine – became The Valley.

A pub by the River Irk, on the edge of an estate.

The Valley it seems ran dry, there was little or nothing to be said:

“When I visited this pub it was called The Vine, this pub is on an estate that seemed fairly quiet when I went here. This pub is a typical estate type pub with a bar and smarter lounge I had a drink in the bar and this was a decent enough room to have a drink in.

This pub used to be a Boddingtons tied house and there was only one real ale on the bar this was Boddingtons bitter and this was a decent enough drink.

This was one of the better pubs I have visited in collyhurst.”

Somebody was dead:

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/stabbed-man-dies-after-pub-888756

 

The doors closed.

Billy Greens – Collyhurst

17, Talgarth Road, Collyhurst, Manchester, M40 7QA

Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 13.45.23

Billy Green was a boxer.

Billy Green was a landlord.

Billy Green kept The Vauxhall in Collyhurst – The Vauxhall was named for the nearby Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, formerly Tinker’s and Elysian Gardens.

AN00760667_001_l

Collyhurst was then a rural idyll, lit with swaying lanterns, lilting music and laughter filled the night air, my how little has changed.

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/manchesters-lost-pleasure-gardens-913985

Billy Greens was a pub, named after Billy Green.

3538832222_1d9a15430f_b

Reputedly the toughest pub in Britain.

Point a camera at a hard man and he’ll tell you exactly what you want to hear, it’s easy, though it’s much, much harder to fill a pub these days – tough times.

Standing lost and forlorn in a sea of green grass – nobody’s home, laid low by a litre and a half of Lambrini or six.

Bare burnt rafters, boarded doors, the sign no longer swings in the wind.

Somebody just called tinned-up time.

Billy Greens is no more.

 

The Clarendon – Collyhurst

27 Pinehurst Rd, Manchester, M40 8QB

Screen Shot 2016-01-08 at 05.54.04

I’m turning a corner.

I’m turning a corner in my life, I’m turning a corner.

Into Pinehurst Road.

The Clarendon is a shock and a pleasant surprise, an open elevation of slabbed precast concrete, exterior steel spiral staircase attached.

A central residential block, with single storey lounge and bar extensions, surrounded by sufficient space to circumnavigate, marvel and snap with consummate ease.

Laura the current tenant comes out to chat, she’d worked there for some eighteen years, and when the pub fell empty just before Christmas, she decided to take it on. Determined to maintain continuity for a community pub which she, and hopefully others valued.

Never an easy undertaking.

We went inside, a clean orderly and cared for interior, warmed by a single Calor Gas heater.

“It’s too dear to put the heating on all the time.”

Good luck Laura.

 

The Queens Hotel – Collyhurst

Sedgeford Rd, Manchester, Lancashire M40 8QU

Screen Shot 2016-01-07 at 17.28.12

Geologists use the term Collyhurst Sandstone for the soft red sandstone, which occurs in North West England. It is a sedimentary rock, created from desert sands blown into dune formations during the Early Permian period, when the area was within the desert belts to the north of the equator. The rock is not very resistant to weathering and erosion and disintegrates relatively quickly.

Historically Collyhurst provided much of the stone which built Manchester.

The Collyhurst Quarry is now gone, landscaped and badged as Sandhills, something of a misplaced, forlorn inner-city country park.

The area is literally built on shifting sands, walking the streets on a Wednesday in deep Winter, one can’t help but be minded of those wind blown Permian deserts.

Collyhurst was once at the very centre of industrial Manchester.

Large tracts of social housing were built in the area, for a workforce that fuelled and fed that City’s steady beating heart.

That industry and heart are now elsewhere, the Sixties estates and their inhabitants however, prevail – the pubs that prospered during the good times are just about hanging on.

The Queens, brick and concrete palace, boasting an Alan Bosyon mural, and bold, modernist, rectangular volumes on an expansive site.

Stop look and listen, to the wind.